Category Archives for San Miguel de Allende

Day Ten: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

 

Though it is still in progress, I present to you my final painting of this challenge.

Thank you, yes you, for following along with me. Your views and comments and likes and shares lit a fire under my butt to keep on painting. I learned about myself and the practice of painting, painted some of the best paintings I’ve done, and I couldn’t have done it without you.

This painting is another from the Storyville prostitutes, whose lives across the border mirrored the lives of their Mexican counterparts.  The women would all dance in the hall, turn a trick, and more often than not sit and play cards when business was slow.

Although this is a New Orleans sourced photo, I’ll be using the designs from traditional Mexican handicrafts for the pillows, and work in photo references from our Casa de la Noche show for the girls.

Now it’s time to finish off these paintings and get them ready for the show!

September 12th, 5-8 at the Bordello Galeria in Casa de la Noche, #19 Organos, San Miguel de Allende.

 

 

 

Day Nine: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

Eureka.

I have figured out what was flummoxing me in my initial paintings of these ladies of the night–texture. The gorgeous and CHEAP handmade canvas, with it’s almost 3 inch deep frame and pre-toned primer applies, has a very different texture than the usual plastic-wrapped sort I’d get at El Pato or art supply stores in the states.

The toothy, richly toned canvas is ideal for a dry brush technique, where just a tad bit of paint is scrumbled, painting in a circular motion. I originally discovered this on day 5 of the challenge, but I added too much paint and lost the lovely, delicate quality of soft-toned skin that I had fallen for just a few brush strokes ago…

That’s why Day 6 of the 10 paintings in 10 days challenge produced one of my favorite works of late-I applied what I learned in day 5.

I used the same approach for today’s painting.

maria

 

The internet here in San Miguel seems to be taking a siesta…or more likely tipsy on tequila, since it’s past midnight as I clock in day 9, so I can only load this one photo of the process.

This dama  had a challenging, and yet resigned look in her photo. I was inspired to put the stamp of the San Miguel health inspection stamp on her card behind her head like an off-kilter halo. She immediately became Maria for me, a fallen angel, a very different manifestation of virgin mother…or perhaps more Mary Magdalene? Her breast is bared to offer sustenance, like each Mary did in her own way, and as all women offer themselves in one way or another to create life in this world.

I’m going to cut myself a break and add all the gold I want on this one. The Klimt influence gets to flirt with italian renaissance representations of the divine feminine. Loving that learning from my mistakes this past ten days, and learning how to use my materials, has led to the creation of this Maria.

Day 8: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

10 Paintings in 10 days? What was I thinking?

I have to admit, I jumped into this challenge without really knowing what I was getting myself into. I had adopted a looser, faster style recently, and felt confident that I could at least make a really strong start on all the pieces for the show coming up in TWO WEEKS.

What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger…

One thing I love about this challenge is that it is keeping me painting in the studio, as non-stop as I can manage between teaching and celebrating life, like you do in Mexico (it’s a requirement here, like sitting in traffic in the states).

I think of painting like working out, you go to the gym and it hurts every time and you sweat every time…but each time you get back in there, you’re able to lift heavier and heavier weights.

But I gotta admit that painting is HARRRD.

I tell my students that, if they’re lucky, they will like 1 out of every 50 pieces of their work. Most often, we see what we want to fix, or what needs work, not the nice painting others see.

For day 8’s painting I revised a canvas I had all but cast aside

I went back to the studio, and knowing that I HAD to paint something tonight, I revised a painting that is very special to me that I had set aside months ago in frustration.

This painting is a gift to the wonderful host family I lived with my first 10 months in San Miguel, a portrait of their 3 fantastic kids.

Breaking my own rules of painting

Unfortunately, when I began the painting, I was out of practice drawing and broke all of the rules I use now. In fact, I learned my rules from my mistakes with this painting: now, I draw the subject at least 2 or three times before painting–the more I draw studies, the better the final painting.

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Rule 1: Do practice drawings first! Or else…

 

I began this painting a year ago, no drawing studies, little practice. But I did them! Although I wasn’t satisfied with the original lay-in, the drawing in paint that sets the stage for the final piece, I continued on. So today, I had to work on reframing the faces and fixing some basic drawing issues I had in the beginning. Next, I need to add color so they don’t look like vampires and do the background.

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this might be ok if the painting looked like the girl on the right. but it doesn’t…

I may still have a few more visits to the art-gym before I finish this painting, but I’m grateful this challenge has pushed me to keep working on it!

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getting closer

Day Seven: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

parlor girl

 

 

Painting number 7 is a big step away from what I had envisioned originally for this series. I have gotten away from the pure portraits of the ladies, which were taken from their health registration photo IDs, and I now want to show them in context of their life. The more I study this subject, the more fascinated I am by the daily life and social position of these women.

When I began painting them, I felt sorry for the shady ladies of San Miguel’s past. However, a book I’ve been listening to (audiobook style while I paint, a big time addiction for me) documents the lives of 1860s-1930s harlots from Colorado, and it has introduced me to a new concept of these women’s life. The book, Brothels, Bordellos, and Bad Girls, talks about how many of the ladies of the night were not victims, but wild child types who did not want to live the formulaic, oppressive life of pious mothers with a hoard of children to support. They wanted to get drunk and dance and sleep around, be independent and make their own money. In many ways, the average female U.S. college student has a lifestyle more similar to the bordello girl’s than to the proper social lady’s life a century back.

Anywho, here I used a reference photo from the infamous prostitute shots from Storyville, a 1912 New Orlean’s brothel where photographer E.J. Bellocq got intimate with the madame and was able to peek inside the lives of his muses when they were working, playing, and relaxing.

Parlor girl 2

 

I’m having so much fun putting the ladies in context–although the scene is from 1912 New Orleans I will be using a face from the San Miguel girls, and with Mexico being a little bit behind the fashion the states I think it is still very fitting. More importantly, these girls shared the connection of their profession, their status, and in this photo in particular, one might imagined that there were times that they enjoyed their job.

Painting this gave me a much bigger appreciation for the composition. Although I loved the photo at first glance, only after I took the time to look deeply as an artist did I notice just how MANY patterns and designs liven up this image. The stockings are the focal point, of course. Love it!

Day Five: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

I had no idea how much I would enjoy today’s painting process, even though there are a few lil things I still want to tinker with, as usual.

I knew I wanted all white for this portrait, with the features of the woman coming through almost as if from a fog, ghostly pale, all but for her dark hair and eyes.

Of all the women who once worked at the bordello on San Miguel de Allende, I thought this woman’s innocent visage seemed the most unsuspecting. Her white dress in her photo inspired me to turn up the blanca and use as little of the other colors as possible.

 

White Lady 1

 

As I began, I feel in love with how the white paint interacted with the sienna toned background. Instead of adding coming to make a shade for the contours of her face, I could just apply LESS white and scrumble the brush into the canvas for the mid tones (scrumbling is when you use very little paint on  a stiff bristle brush and rub it into the canvas in a circular motion).

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The effect was very soft and lovely, just what I had sensed from the lady of the night’s sad sweet face.

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After adding a raw umber (dark dark brown), I was less enchanted. Even the mouth on this lady is turned up like she’s less than pleased. However, after going in to add some light peachy tones and enhancing her eyes, I think she’s coming along rather prettily, as you see below.

 

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I think I might have hints of a subtle rose playing in the layers of white, and I’m debating whether or not to give her deep crimson red lipstick, just on the top lip. Please do comment with your thoughts below, or like on Facebook!

See you tomorrow with another San Miguel de Allende damsel on the easel.

Day Four: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

And now, drumroll please…. painting number 4!

Today’s painting really took on a life of its own. It began with a simple concept for the composition, a more of less exact rendering of the photo of a striking woman with fierce eyes but a girlish white bow in her hair, looking through her lashes at the camera.

All of the photos in this series come from the health department credentials the women kept up with once-weekly visits to the doctor’s office to ensure their cleanliness and availability to work. While most of the faces are drawn, this saucy face captured my attention.

 

In process oil portrait lay in

I began with an ultramarine blue layout on a dark grey toned canvas.

 

 

underapinting portrait

Next I added in big areas of color. Although I was originally thinking of painting her in creamy white with navy blue and deep red accents, the Mexican flag colors snuck their way onto the canvas. The complementary colors and steamy effect the red had on her face reminded me of the jungle.

Jardin Shadow

The jungle colors reminded me of a photo I took not so long ago in the jardin, the main plaza and heart of San Miguel de Allende, where the Parroquia church is perched like a fanciful sandcastle in the middle of the city. Under the shade of manicured trees, locals and tourists alike sit opposite the church and watch each other coming and going in the flamboyant colors of Mexico. This one particular day, the shows of the trees played like lace on the stones of the jardin square.

tree lace

 

 

I thought that this would be a perfect complement to the portrait of a woman who undoubtedly strolled through the jardin all her life in San Miguel. A source from the documentary on the bordello said that most of the girls had pseudonyms at work, so that they wouldn’t be bothered or known by name when they were out and about in town.

Detail

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I like how the red creates a sultriness to her personality. A sunset beauty in the shade of the jardin trees.

This canvas might get some lime green and pink added before the night of the opening, but I like the direction so far. Hope you do too!

 

Day Three: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

May I present a composition I completed today for a commission: Abuelo con Ninos.

abuelo

I struggled for ages with this piece. The concept is poignant, my Spanish teacher told me months ago how her father died of pancreatic cancer only 2 days before she gave birth to her first child, Juan Pablo, who is now my 5 year old art student. Funny how things loop around that way in Mexico.

She wanted me to paint her father with her 2 children, so she could feel that on some level, they were all together.

Unfortunately, she only had one photo for me to work with: her dad, face completely covered in shadows, then separate shots of the kids.

Painting this scene was tricky. I prefer to be very literal in my portraits, but with so little information to go on with this piece I kind of had to make things up.

Tomorrow, worry not, you will see a prostitute, so if your questionable morality was disappointed tonight, worry not! More ladies coming soon. Please do comment below, and thanks for keeping track during this 10 day challenge!

Day One: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

6Ladies

Painted Ladies, oil on canvas, 6 panels on board, Jessica Antonelli, 2015.

Day One: Painted Ladies

It’s day one, and I’m diving into all kinds of loopholes in my approach to finishing 10 paintings in 10 days.

Loophole 1: To begin with, my first painting (singular) is composed of 6 small canvases, about 5×7 inches more or less, which will be framed together on a dark grey mat. So, woohoo! Bonus paintings and it’s just day one!

Loophole 2: Maybe painting 6 mini-portraits will get help me get away with the fact that this whole process did not happen all in one day.
In fact, let me set the stage for the next 10 days: I will be working on paintings that I will be preparing in advance!

To be fair, only 2 of the other portraits for the Ladies of the Night art opening coming up have got some of the under-paintings begun, so I will paint in the beginning compositions for the others in the coming days. Let’s not make it too easy on me, right?

The Process

 

 

 

 

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I began by toning the canvases with the limited palette I wanted to play with for these pieces. Then I blocked in an initial lay-in of the general proportions of each face and frame

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Building up each new color one at a time, I used a little bit of every yellow, lavender, and cadmium red on each canvas to harmonize the colors across the 6 pieces.

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The features begin to come clear as darker tones add focus

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Adding ultramarine blue to burnt sienna gave me a great dark tone to really up the contrast.

I so super enjoyed playing with this funky-hued, stencil-like style for the first painting of the challenge.

The playfulness of it allowed me to really feel joyful coming into the studio, which is an excellent way to start things off. I also got a chance to practice painting these particular women, some of whom I am going to paint on a much larger scale. The more I paint and draw a subject, the better I get at capturing them. With these subjects, it’s also been fascinating to imagine their world.

Please comment below to let me know what you think of the piece! I am thinking of re-arranging the 6 ladies as shown in the above shot so that the far left ladies switch places. Thoughts?

Meet the San Miguel Art Teacher Interview Series: Joseph Bennett

Why Interview Art Teachers in San Miguel?

The first thing I did on my very first visit to San Miguel de Allende was look for an art class to take. I was so inspired by the colors and vibrancy of the city, I wanted to jump in to the art scene here.

Much to my millennial-minded dismay, the Google search results in Mexico don’t match up to the extensive answers you get when you ask Siri a question on your iPhone.  The art classes I found either no longer existed, or were postponed for another month, or had no one on the other end of the phone number listed.

I wanted it to be easy to find the best art teachers in town.

When I moved to San Miguel just 1 year after I first visited, I began the hunt to find out where to take art classes, and also where to teach them.
I became an art teacher of drawing and portraiture painting, and began to collect the names and contact info of the other wonderful art teachers I met along the way.

Now it’s time to get to know the best art teachers in town. 

This list will continue to grow and change as we update our list and get to know more of the teaching talent in San Miguel, be it in painting, assemblage, ceramics, or making the giant traditional Mexican puppets that dance through the center of town.

If you are an art teacher in San Miguel or of you would like to recommend one, please contact us at jescantonelli@gmail.com.

What’s the best way to find the right teacher? Videos! 

I am a big believer in the idea that different personalities and learning styles need different types of teachers. I decided to not just write out the interviews, but to record them, so that you can get a sense of the personality and teaching style of the SMA art teachers before you sign up for a class.

Time to meet our first art teacher: Joseph Bennett

Artist and teacher Joseph Bennett has enjoyed international acclaim for his found-object assemblage pieces. Joseph is a Renaissance man, with a passion for theatre, art, service, his interior design business, therapeutic services business, and more. In this energy, we see the energy and professionalism that make it all possible, and we get to ogle the wabi-sabi beauty of Joseph’s artworks.
Do you have dilapidated treasures hiding in a box in your closet, waiting to be reborn, to tell their story, as art? Assemblage is waiting. In this interview, get to know the teacher and what to expect before your class with Joseph, and learn the keys to creativity that Joseph use to maintain his creative and successful artistic lifestyle.
To see more of Joseph’s work or to sign up for a class, please visit www.artbyBennett.com, or like his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ArtbyBennett
On Joseph’s work
“Bennett’s assemblages range from architectonic, all-white pieces that wouldn’t be out of place in a textbook on Minimalist design, to veritable cornucopias overflowing with surreal, mind-numbing assortments of minor treasures.”
Mark Elliot Lugo, Curator“Joseph Bennett is guided by a love for found objects. His ability to see their potential as bearers of stories guides him as much as a consideration of form, color, contrast, balance and texture. On a formal level, his assemblages show an affinity for the properties of early synthetic cubism, surrealism and
primitive art. On an emotional level, however, the bits and pieces that make up the work are already suffused with meaning and help communicate a more personal message.”
Karen McGuire, Curator

On Joseph’s Teaching
“A ton of specific, practical ideas + applications along with inspirational enthusiasm. Thank you Joseph!”
Eric Peterson“Well- paced, mastery of subject, focused. I can tell that you really know what you are doing. Thank you for a fantastic workshop! You are a pro!”
Carole Clement 

Palette Knife Painting Time Lapse

I have always loved the striking textures and unique way that oil paint mixes when applied to the canvas with a palette knife, so I decided to give it a go and experiment in this portrait of one of the working girls from Casa de la Noche, a bordello that was active here in San Miguel in the last century.

Here is the original photo I was working from.

Casa de la Noche Lady

 

Or to be clear, I used my nascent skills in PhotoShop (I know, I should have learned it 10 years ago!) to adjust the colors in the above photo so that I could choose a combination I liked without wasting real paint.

Here’s the color animation that I created to help me choose my palette:

 

Once I saw the color combination I liked best, I simply pause my video and used these colors for my palette knife painting.

What do you like better, the oil painted version or the digital art? Comment below!

Also, stay tuned for some exciting insider art announcements for those interested in taking classes in San Miguel! There’s a Studio Antonelli exclusive coming your way soon.