All Posts by jescantonelli@gmail.com

Day Five: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

I had no idea how much I would enjoy today’s painting process, even though there are a few lil things I still want to tinker with, as usual.

I knew I wanted all white for this portrait, with the features of the woman coming through almost as if from a fog, ghostly pale, all but for her dark hair and eyes.

Of all the women who once worked at the bordello on San Miguel de Allende, I thought this woman’s innocent visage seemed the most unsuspecting. Her white dress in her photo inspired me to turn up the blanca and use as little of the other colors as possible.

 

White Lady 1

 

As I began, I feel in love with how the white paint interacted with the sienna toned background. Instead of adding coming to make a shade for the contours of her face, I could just apply LESS white and scrumble the brush into the canvas for the mid tones (scrumbling is when you use very little paint on  a stiff bristle brush and rub it into the canvas in a circular motion).

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The effect was very soft and lovely, just what I had sensed from the lady of the night’s sad sweet face.

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After adding a raw umber (dark dark brown), I was less enchanted. Even the mouth on this lady is turned up like she’s less than pleased. However, after going in to add some light peachy tones and enhancing her eyes, I think she’s coming along rather prettily, as you see below.

 

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I think I might have hints of a subtle rose playing in the layers of white, and I’m debating whether or not to give her deep crimson red lipstick, just on the top lip. Please do comment with your thoughts below, or like on Facebook!

See you tomorrow with another San Miguel de Allende damsel on the easel.

Day Four: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

And now, drumroll please…. painting number 4!

Today’s painting really took on a life of its own. It began with a simple concept for the composition, a more of less exact rendering of the photo of a striking woman with fierce eyes but a girlish white bow in her hair, looking through her lashes at the camera.

All of the photos in this series come from the health department credentials the women kept up with once-weekly visits to the doctor’s office to ensure their cleanliness and availability to work. While most of the faces are drawn, this saucy face captured my attention.

 

In process oil portrait lay in

I began with an ultramarine blue layout on a dark grey toned canvas.

 

 

underapinting portrait

Next I added in big areas of color. Although I was originally thinking of painting her in creamy white with navy blue and deep red accents, the Mexican flag colors snuck their way onto the canvas. The complementary colors and steamy effect the red had on her face reminded me of the jungle.

Jardin Shadow

The jungle colors reminded me of a photo I took not so long ago in the jardin, the main plaza and heart of San Miguel de Allende, where the Parroquia church is perched like a fanciful sandcastle in the middle of the city. Under the shade of manicured trees, locals and tourists alike sit opposite the church and watch each other coming and going in the flamboyant colors of Mexico. This one particular day, the shows of the trees played like lace on the stones of the jardin square.

tree lace

 

 

I thought that this would be a perfect complement to the portrait of a woman who undoubtedly strolled through the jardin all her life in San Miguel. A source from the documentary on the bordello said that most of the girls had pseudonyms at work, so that they wouldn’t be bothered or known by name when they were out and about in town.

Detail

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I like how the red creates a sultriness to her personality. A sunset beauty in the shade of the jardin trees.

This canvas might get some lime green and pink added before the night of the opening, but I like the direction so far. Hope you do too!

 

Day Three: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

May I present a composition I completed today for a commission: Abuelo con Ninos.

abuelo

I struggled for ages with this piece. The concept is poignant, my Spanish teacher told me months ago how her father died of pancreatic cancer only 2 days before she gave birth to her first child, Juan Pablo, who is now my 5 year old art student. Funny how things loop around that way in Mexico.

She wanted me to paint her father with her 2 children, so she could feel that on some level, they were all together.

Unfortunately, she only had one photo for me to work with: her dad, face completely covered in shadows, then separate shots of the kids.

Painting this scene was tricky. I prefer to be very literal in my portraits, but with so little information to go on with this piece I kind of had to make things up.

Tomorrow, worry not, you will see a prostitute, so if your questionable morality was disappointed tonight, worry not! More ladies coming soon. Please do comment below, and thanks for keeping track during this 10 day challenge!

Day Two: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

It’s day two, and we’re already facing the conundrum I expected when this challenge began…how will I ever show off my daily paintings when I tend to paint mostly 8-12midnight?

So, here is a little teaser of the painting I will complete this evening, and the process that I’ve gone through in creating this lady in red:

20150822_224933 20150822_230441 palette knife red over grey laying in red portrait in process lady in red

I love seeing how the portrait evolves, from a mess to something with a life of its own.

So what’s next for this lady in red?
I decided I want her red, red, red, but I’m not sure how this will manifest itself on the canvas. I love the simple lines of her blue underpainting, and since the reference photos are so blurred–they’re from 1936 after all–it forces me to keep it simple.

I am taking major inspiration from one of my all-time favorites, illustrator Camila do Rosario. Check out her work below:

Camila do Rosario

Camila do Rosario

 

I am OBSESSED with the gorgeous simplicity in her portraiture, and how softly she illustrates the texture of hair…in much of her work, it really feels alive. Not to mention the sexy, spicy color palette and the patterns and rhythm in the costumes of her ladies. The black and white figures make the colors in the accessories really pop.

Ok, stay tuned to see how I merge the lady in red with my muse Camila, I’ll have the final portrait up by midnight!

UPDATE 12:05

Well, the internet here is on Mexican time, but here she is!

lady in red

 

I have to say I am loving the time crunch! I put a 30, 10, or 5 minute timer on and try get one glaze of paint done in that time. It’s necessary considering how easy it is to lose track of time painting!

I think I’m going to turn up the contrast a big and elaborate on the details…I’ll keep you posted 😉

 

Day One: 10 Paintings in 10 Days

6Ladies

Painted Ladies, oil on canvas, 6 panels on board, Jessica Antonelli, 2015.

Day One: Painted Ladies

It’s day one, and I’m diving into all kinds of loopholes in my approach to finishing 10 paintings in 10 days.

Loophole 1: To begin with, my first painting (singular) is composed of 6 small canvases, about 5×7 inches more or less, which will be framed together on a dark grey mat. So, woohoo! Bonus paintings and it’s just day one!

Loophole 2: Maybe painting 6 mini-portraits will get help me get away with the fact that this whole process did not happen all in one day.
In fact, let me set the stage for the next 10 days: I will be working on paintings that I will be preparing in advance!

To be fair, only 2 of the other portraits for the Ladies of the Night art opening coming up have got some of the under-paintings begun, so I will paint in the beginning compositions for the others in the coming days. Let’s not make it too easy on me, right?

The Process

 

 

 

 

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I began by toning the canvases with the limited palette I wanted to play with for these pieces. Then I blocked in an initial lay-in of the general proportions of each face and frame

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Building up each new color one at a time, I used a little bit of every yellow, lavender, and cadmium red on each canvas to harmonize the colors across the 6 pieces.

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The features begin to come clear as darker tones add focus

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Adding ultramarine blue to burnt sienna gave me a great dark tone to really up the contrast.

I so super enjoyed playing with this funky-hued, stencil-like style for the first painting of the challenge.

The playfulness of it allowed me to really feel joyful coming into the studio, which is an excellent way to start things off. I also got a chance to practice painting these particular women, some of whom I am going to paint on a much larger scale. The more I paint and draw a subject, the better I get at capturing them. With these subjects, it’s also been fascinating to imagine their world.

Please comment below to let me know what you think of the piece! I am thinking of re-arranging the 6 ladies as shown in the above shot so that the far left ladies switch places. Thoughts?

Meet the San Miguel Art Teacher Interview Series: Joseph Bennett

Why Interview Art Teachers in San Miguel?

The first thing I did on my very first visit to San Miguel de Allende was look for an art class to take. I was so inspired by the colors and vibrancy of the city, I wanted to jump in to the art scene here.

Much to my millennial-minded dismay, the Google search results in Mexico don’t match up to the extensive answers you get when you ask Siri a question on your iPhone.  The art classes I found either no longer existed, or were postponed for another month, or had no one on the other end of the phone number listed.

I wanted it to be easy to find the best art teachers in town.

When I moved to San Miguel just 1 year after I first visited, I began the hunt to find out where to take art classes, and also where to teach them.
I became an art teacher of drawing and portraiture painting, and began to collect the names and contact info of the other wonderful art teachers I met along the way.

Now it’s time to get to know the best art teachers in town. 

This list will continue to grow and change as we update our list and get to know more of the teaching talent in San Miguel, be it in painting, assemblage, ceramics, or making the giant traditional Mexican puppets that dance through the center of town.

If you are an art teacher in San Miguel or of you would like to recommend one, please contact us at jescantonelli@gmail.com.

What’s the best way to find the right teacher? Videos! 

I am a big believer in the idea that different personalities and learning styles need different types of teachers. I decided to not just write out the interviews, but to record them, so that you can get a sense of the personality and teaching style of the SMA art teachers before you sign up for a class.

Time to meet our first art teacher: Joseph Bennett

Artist and teacher Joseph Bennett has enjoyed international acclaim for his found-object assemblage pieces. Joseph is a Renaissance man, with a passion for theatre, art, service, his interior design business, therapeutic services business, and more. In this energy, we see the energy and professionalism that make it all possible, and we get to ogle the wabi-sabi beauty of Joseph’s artworks.
Do you have dilapidated treasures hiding in a box in your closet, waiting to be reborn, to tell their story, as art? Assemblage is waiting. In this interview, get to know the teacher and what to expect before your class with Joseph, and learn the keys to creativity that Joseph use to maintain his creative and successful artistic lifestyle.
To see more of Joseph’s work or to sign up for a class, please visit www.artbyBennett.com, or like his Facebook page at www.facebook.com/ArtbyBennett
On Joseph’s work
“Bennett’s assemblages range from architectonic, all-white pieces that wouldn’t be out of place in a textbook on Minimalist design, to veritable cornucopias overflowing with surreal, mind-numbing assortments of minor treasures.”
Mark Elliot Lugo, Curator“Joseph Bennett is guided by a love for found objects. His ability to see their potential as bearers of stories guides him as much as a consideration of form, color, contrast, balance and texture. On a formal level, his assemblages show an affinity for the properties of early synthetic cubism, surrealism and
primitive art. On an emotional level, however, the bits and pieces that make up the work are already suffused with meaning and help communicate a more personal message.”
Karen McGuire, Curator

On Joseph’s Teaching
“A ton of specific, practical ideas + applications along with inspirational enthusiasm. Thank you Joseph!”
Eric Peterson“Well- paced, mastery of subject, focused. I can tell that you really know what you are doing. Thank you for a fantastic workshop! You are a pro!”
Carole Clement 

Palette Knife Painting Time Lapse

I have always loved the striking textures and unique way that oil paint mixes when applied to the canvas with a palette knife, so I decided to give it a go and experiment in this portrait of one of the working girls from Casa de la Noche, a bordello that was active here in San Miguel in the last century.

Here is the original photo I was working from.

Casa de la Noche Lady

 

Or to be clear, I used my nascent skills in PhotoShop (I know, I should have learned it 10 years ago!) to adjust the colors in the above photo so that I could choose a combination I liked without wasting real paint.

Here’s the color animation that I created to help me choose my palette:

 

Once I saw the color combination I liked best, I simply pause my video and used these colors for my palette knife painting.

What do you like better, the oil painted version or the digital art? Comment below!

Also, stay tuned for some exciting insider art announcements for those interested in taking classes in San Miguel! There’s a Studio Antonelli exclusive coming your way soon.

 

 

 

Step-by-Step though a Quick Oil Portrait

Just wanted to share with you the steps I took to paint a quick self portrait.

All in all I was super-pleased by what happened when I let go and loosened up with oil.

1) My first recommendation is to mix a flesh palette with strong warm red and green undertones. I like playing with variations if this recipe from Terry Stricklan.

2) Your next step is to use a medium tone for the background of your canvas. Since this is more of a study/practice piece, I’m working on a sheet of canvas pad mounted on board. My background is a thin yellow ochre–smudged on with a rag with a good dose of turpentine.

3) Then, I used a thick bristle brush and raw umber mixed with a generous dose of turpentine to lay in an underpainting. This is big and general and because I’m using oil I can smudge it around in my next layers.

For this step, I’m just trying to identify the big shapes of the very darkest areas.Lay in

4) Next, I looked for shapes of color around my face. I painted in the lightest flesh tone with a naples yellow at the forehead. I saw a blueish highlight, just a tinge of coolness around the eyes, and painted it in knowing I can lighten it up later.

Shapes of color

It was at this point that my painting class saw the piece and got excited–this was so fresh and loose that my usual time-consuming meticulousness.

Once they said they liked it, I didn’t want to change it and mess it up! Still:

5) I knew I needed to have a full range of values, so I added the whites of the eyes and a hint of teeth. I blended the white, more naples yellow, and blended to make a more realistic flesh tone in the face and neck.

refining

6) The final version blended the green and red undertones around eyes and mouth. A loose, suggestive white brushstroke, painted on thickly with just a touch of Liquin** medium for fluidity, helped better illustrate the double light source, coming in from behind and the right.

7) I also finally adjusted the nostrils into their proper places (was that bettering you too?), and brightened and simplified the teeth. The fewer lines you paint when you paint teeth, the better.

All in all the painting took 2 about  hours, with just a little less than an hour of prep: the palette, toning the background, and taking a reference photo to paint of myself. I took it using my laptop in the bright afternoon light on the patio.

Comment below if you’re curious about any of the steps I took painting this quick loose painting, or what your own method is for alla-prima portraiture.

**I am a Liquin junkie.

The Suffering Artista in Mexico

I’m going to tell you the story of how falling off a ladder trying to get up to a roof in San Miguel de Allende finally helped me to understand the worst cuss-word there is in Mexican spanish: hijo de la chingada.
Along the way, I learned the value of suffering in art through reflections of la chingada in Mexican art, and you can’t talk about women and suffering and Mexico and art without the holy visage of Frida ascending her way into the conversation.

To illustrate, I have 2 Before and After shots to put before you today.

Before and After #1… The Artist on Tuesday.

fresh self portrait june 8 2015

Before, Jessica Antonelli Self-Portrait, oil on canvas, June 8 2015

This was an exciting self portrait, done in less than 2 hours, and much looser than my usual tight, realistic style. I was so excited at the breakthrough in brushstrokes I went out with friends that night. With a mezcalito too many in me, I decided I’d brave a ladder leading up to a scenic roof that I’d been too weenie to climb up before.

But that weenie-ness was wiseness in disguise. I crashed down to the tile floor, landing mostly on my wrist, secondly on my face.

Which leads us to the Artist After the Fall…

After portrait

After, Jessica Antonelli self-portrait, oil on canvas, June 12, 2015

I was never as bloody as this intimates with the magenta slipping down the canvas like that, but I was desperate to get some of that raw emotion out of me and note the canvas before I lost the opportunity to catch it in oil instead of bottling it up inside. Frida has a great quote on that:

"Walling in your own suffering is risking that it will devouring you from within." Frida Kahlo

“Walling in your own suffering is risking that it will devour you from within.” Frida Kahlo

I couldn’t help googling the wheezy out of Frida while I was recuperating. Mexico is rather famous for it’s suffering females, and Frida Kahlo reached icon status after a lifetime spent suffering from everything from polio, to a spine-crunching trolly accident, to a philandering spouse–the world-famous Diego Rivera, whose betrayals were so devastating he even had an affair with Frida’s sister.

broken_column

The Broken Column, 1944, oil on wood, Frida Kahlo

 

 

 But it wasn’t just Frida who led me to understand one of the worse spanish cuss words. I’ve been hanging out with enough local good influences in Mexico, that after the fall I thought to myself se chingo, that arm got fucked up. Perhaps it was the influence of the anesthesia that had me dreamily wonder about something or other I’d heard about Mexico herself being referred to as la chingada, or the fucked over.

I did some intensive research by typing the question into google.

la chingada definition

Please, please, if you have time and any interest in the complexity of Mexican culture and gender and vulgarities and identity crisis, read this excerpt from Octovio Paz’s The Labryrinth of Solitude.

The title in the pdf is Sons of La MalincheHijos de la Chingada, and the story of La Malinche came back to me from an early spanish class here in San Miguel de Allende.

La Malinche was in the nobility in her native indian Atzec people when Cortez and his Spaniards arrived with conquest on their minds. The trilingual La Malinche helped translate her native Nahuatl language into Spanish, much to Cortes’s advantage.

José Clemente Orozco's "Cortés and Malinche" (1926). Image from Allegory of a Revolution

José Clemente Orozco’s “Cortés and Malinche” (1926). Image from Allegory of a Revolution

Not only did Cortes take advantage of La Malinche’s language skills, he violently opposed and brought down her home nation, had a son by her, and then abandoned it all. No small wonder that her experience of being fucked, being aggressively used and screwed over in both micro and meta ways, have led her to be known as la chingada, the Mexican Eve, and the mother of all Mexicans who call themselves hijos de la chingada.

Octavio Paz says it so much better than me. Here’s another link to read that article, seriously now.

I mentioned I was in an anesthesia haze during all of this, but here’s another Before and After to prove I’m a suffering artist, in case the portraiture didn’t convince you:

Before …The Artist’s LEFT (thank God) Wrist on Tuesday

Before, Front View

Before, Front View

 

Before Side View

Before Side View

Aaaand After

After, X Ray Frontal

After, X Ray Frontal

I will have this apparatus on for the next 6 weeks, and tonight I’m feeling rather grateful that the suffering of a broken wrist has led me to a deeper understanding of Mexican culture and cussing. Without this horrifying clamp in my arm I never would’ve seen Orozco’s haunting and powerful mural image of La Malinche and Cortes, or painted out my feelings in that self-portrait I finished today that exhausted my energy reserves, but still left me feeling stronger.

More importantly I must thank my family and friends who helped me get to the right hospital in Mexico, or immediately flew into San Miguel to nurse me back to health, or were so stinkin’ worried about where I’d disappeared to they filed a missing persons report on me while I was having surgery. Love you guys. Muchas. Muchas. Gracias.

 

 

Visiting the Frida Museum, Mexico D.F.

Easter weekend, and the line around the Frida Kahlo museum wrapped twice up and down the street in Coyocan where Frida and Diego Rivera once lived, painted, and hosted the likes of Leon Trotsky.

No way were we going to wait in line two hours.

Here’s the Best way to avoid the line at the Frida Museum:

Go online to buy your tickets in advance at this website, show up at your appointed time, and skip the line! It costs a bit more but it’s well worth it. However, weekdays are not as busy as a holiday weekend, so you can probably get in without too long of a wait most of the time.

Museo Frida

After escaping the line, we went a few blocks away to the Trotsky Museum, the former residence of the man whose name is it’s own -ism, Trotskyism.  In his fort-like home, he was assassinated with an ice pick, although not before carrying on an affair with Frida, who often cheated on her husband Rivera to counter her husband’s many infidelities.

I knew a lot about Frida and Trotsky’s scandalous affair from one of my all time favorite books, Frida, a Biography of Frida Kahlo, by Hayden Herrera. (Her life is beyond fiction. A must read.)

What I did not know is that the Mexican Muralist Siqueiros participated in an attempt to murder Trotsky before the guy with the ice pick finished the job…Can you imagine Diego and Siqueiros as contemporaries, two of the most famous artists of their time, at war over politics that spanned across the globe, rivals in both their views on communism and their approach to painting a wall, Siqueiros actually attempting murder for his ideas… mind boggling.

To visit their homes, and walk the few blocks that Frida would have traversed between her home and Trotsky’s, makes their incredible lives all the more real, and recent.

Frida, Diego, Trotsky and others

Here Frida and Diego, an unlikely couple in themselves, pose with Trotsky and other Marxist sympathizers.

The museum also hosts much of the artwork Frida composed in her time at the home in Coyocan, as well as her preserved painting studio.

Frida's palatte

Here Frida is a geometrical design of Frida’s palette, showing the range of colors she used in her symbolic and surrealistic-ish self-portraiture. Frida's Studio

Frida’s studio. It is worth it to pay and extra 30 pesos to take pictures. Otherwise, you have to put the cameras away!

Visiting edgy Mexico City helped me to understand the raw passion Frida had for life, she having grown up there. It is a city where you must always be alert for trouble, actively keeping track of your purse and how much the taxis are charging. But the alertness makes you feel alive, a part of the city in a way that most safe tourist destinations don’t.

Frida grew up in Mexico City in a time when politics raised blood and saw it spilled in the streets. Diego, who was the most famous artist in Mexico at the time, made artwork a weapon for social change and revolution, favoring a Marxist future for Mexico. His grandiose murals empower the people, the worker, the heart and capable hands of Mexico.

If Diego represents heart and hands, Frida was the soul, la chingada (pardon my spanish) who was ravaged by polio, accidents, heartbreak, and betrayal–and yet her artwork expressed her irreverent attitude toward life, which she laughed at and with, in a way so purely Mexican that it is hard to put in english.

I highly recommend D.F. and Frida’s Museum, but only after reading Frida, a Biography of Frida Kahlo, by Hayden Herrera, which everyone who breaths should read.

Have you been to Mexico City recently? What was your experience? Comment below to share!